MassDOT Earns its First LEED Gold Certification

by Courtney Murtagh, UMTC Intern

LEED

In 2016, MassDOT’s Research and Materials lab was nationally recognized and awarded Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold certification. The award-winning MassDOT facility, located near the Massachusetts Turnpike, was designed by Elkus Manfredi Architects. The LEED certification is a globally recognized award commending sustainable and efficient building design.

The lab is used to run tests on concrete, soils, asphalt, chemicals, and other material for MassDOT Highway Division construction projects. The facility is responsible to evaluate materials for more than 500 ongoing construction projects at any given time.

The building achieved its high rating certification with its sustainable site development, water savings, energy efficiency, renewable materials, and high indoor environmental quality, according to a MassDOT press release.

The building is also equipped with other state-of-the-art green technology including porous pavement for runoff rainwater to charge the water table directly, two dual-port Level-II Electric Vehicle charging stations and a photovoltaic (PV) system that is expected to generate about 675,000-kilowatt hours (kWhs) per year. That energy output is roughly equivalent to 75% of the facility’s projected annual demand, according to the press release.

The Baker-Polito Administration is committed to reducing greenhouse gases (GHG) and increasing energy efficiency. Improving transportation infrastructure is one way the administration is approaching this goal.  “MassDOT’s state-of-the-art Research and Materials lab has many environmentally-friendly features including approximately 500 kW of Solar-Carports, about 40 kW of Rooftop PVs, and south-side self-tinting windows that limit over-heating in the summer and winter, and increase energy efficiency while making the workplace more comfortable for people inside,” said Transportation Secretary and CEO of MassDOT, Stephanie Pollack. The Highway Division is focusing on reducing GHG emissions by reducing the energy and chemicals used in maintenance projects, bettering the ecological performance of land under MassDOT care and control, minimizing exposure to hazardous waste, adapting facilities for climate change resilience, and minimizing developed land use altogether.

The Baker-Polito Administration hosted a series of listening sessions throughout the Commonwealth in late October and early November 2017 to discuss possible ideas and solutions for reducing GHG emissions from the transportation sector. The listening sessions were held in response to the Massachusetts Global Warming Solution Act (2008) and Governor Charlie Baker’s Executive Order 569, An Order Establishing an Integrated Climate Change Strategy for the Commonwealth. The specific regulations of the Executive Order require the Commonwealth to reduce GHG emissions by 25% below the 1990 emissions level by 2020 and by 80% below 1990 levels by 2050. As of 2014, the Commonwealth had reduced emissions to below 21% of the 1990 emissions.