GM Rolling Out AV Fleet

General Motors Company (GM) announced in mid-June that it completed production of 130 self-driving Chevrolet Bolt electric vehicles for testing automated vehicle (AV) technologies on-road. These highly automated vehicles (HAVs) join GM’s more than 50 Chevrolet Bolts with AV technologies already operating on public roads in San Francisco, Detroit, and Scottsdale, Arizona. In April 2017, Spectrum, the flagship magazine for the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), reported on GM plans to have as many as 300 more self-driving vehicles on-road, presumably including the recently completed 130 vehicles. According to Spectrum, GM would then have the largest HAV fleet on-road not only in the United States, but worldwide. Google-based Waymo has the second-largest AV fleet in the United States, with an estimated 160 vehicles on-road.

GM CEO & Chairman Mary Barra with a new Chevrolet Bolt AV (Photo by Paul Sancya, Associated Press)

In GM’s announcement regarding the 130 new self-driving Bolts, GM Chairman and CEO Mary Barra is quoted: “This production milestone brings us one step closer to making our vision of personal mobility a reality …. Expansion of our real-world test fleet will help ensure that our self-driving vehicles meet the same strict standards for safety and quality that we build into all of our vehicles.” CEO Barra has also said that “no other company today has the unique and necessary combination of technology, engineering and manufacturing ability to build autonomous vehicles at scale.”

The new self-driving version of the Chevrolet Bolt is the second generation of GM’s AVs and is capable of handling almost any roadway situation without human driver intervention. The new Bolts are equipped with the latest technologies in cameras, radar (LiDAR), sensors, and related hardware. “There are even a couple of cameras that are dedicated just to seeing traffic lights to make sure you don’t run red lights,” said Kyle Vogt, CEO of Cruise Automation, a self-driving software company that GM acquired in 2016. The GM HAVs always have an employee in the driver’s seat for safety reasons, just in case any intervention is needed. Almost all states with HAV regulations also have the requirement that a human operator be present.

In 2016, GM also partnered with and invested $500 million in ride-sharing company Lyft. In a recent Forbes article, Cruise CEO Vogt wouldn’t confirm a Reuters report that “thousands” of self-driving Chevrolet Bolt hatchbacks will go into service for ride-hailing company Lyft in 2018, but said it wouldn’t be surprising. “We’ve had a plan in place for a while and it’s going according to schedule. From what I can tell it’s much faster and going to happen much sooner than most people in the industry think,” Vogt said. “We’re planning to deploy in a rideshare environment, and very quickly.”

Written by Tracy Zafian, UMTC Research Fellow. 

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