Simulator Evaluation of the Effectiveness of an Comprehensive Teen Driver Training Program

Novice teen drivers are over represented in crashes, particularly rear end, intersection and run- off-the-road crashes. Their over involvement in these crashes appears to be due to six poorly developed skills: tactical and strategic hazard anticipation, tactical and strategic hazard mitigation, and tactical and strategic attention maintenance. Previous studies had determined that a single skill could be taught in a 45 minute training session. The question addressed here was whether all six possible skills could be taught in a two hour session without reducing the effectiveness of the training of the individual skills. Specifically, the current study examines the development and evaluation on a driving simulator of a training program, ACCEL (Accelerated Curriculum to Create Effective Learning), that is designed to decrease the time it takes teens to become safer drivers over the first 18 months of independent driving by targeting for training the above six behaviors in the most risky crash scenarios. During the evaluation, eye movements were recorded and vehicle measures were collected for a total of 75 novice drivers (16 to 18 14 years with less than 6 months’ experience), of which fifty were ACCEL-trained and 25 were Placebo-trained, and 25 experienced drivers (28 to 55 with at least 10 years’ experience), all untrained. ACCEL training was found to significantly improve the performance of novice drivers in 5 out of the 6 of the trained skills when compared to Placebo trained teens: tactical and strategic hazard anticipation, tactical hazard mitigation, and tactical and strategic attention maintenance. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that combined skill training can be deliver effectively in a relatively short amount of time.

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